Information

Evolution


How did life in the terrestrial environment come about?

And how did it evolve? To answer these two questions, one can resort to scientific arguments or not. It is still a common belief that life originated and evolved from the action of a Creator.

On the other hand, there is much scientific evidence, much of it supported by experimental procedures, that life emerged and evolved slowly and progressively, with the active participation of numerous chemical substances and reactions, bioenergetic processes and of course the participation constant environment. The scientific study of the origin of life and biological evolution, which unifies the various biological areas, is one of the most fascinating challenges of today's biology.

Big Bang: The Formation of the Universe

Scientists assume that about 10 to 20 billion years ago a compact mass of matter exploded - the so-called Bing bang - spreading its numerous fragments that move to this day throughout the Universe. These scientists believe that the fragments are continually moving and, therefore, the universe would be continually expanding.

As these fragments became colder, atoms of various chemical elements, especially hydrogen and helium, would have been formed.

The sun would have formed about 5 to 10 billion years ago. The material that formed it would have been compressed by gravitational pull, and it would have ignited, releasing a great deal of heat. As a result, other elements derived from helium and hydrogen would have formed. From the fusion of elements released by the sun, with a large amount of dust and gases, would have originated numerous planets, including the Earth.

There are currently two currents of thought among scientists regarding the origin of life on Earth: one that would have arisen from other planets (panspermia), and another that would have developed gradually in a long process of change, selection and evolution. .